Hastings and Battlefield Abbey

Hastings and Battlefield Abbey

When your name has been Hastings for 45+ years, you can’t come to England and not visit Hastings and the Battlefield.  My son and grandson would enjoy this so much!

I began my visit to Hastings searching for the funicular that would take me to the Castle ruins.  It was quiet a walk from the train station to the tourist info center.  The town had some nice shops and a busy pedestrian center.  I took a wrong turn and walked much further than necessary before realizing that I was heading away from the Castle.  I soon found the funicular and made my way to the Hastings Castle ruins. William I ordered the Castle be rebuilt of stone in 1070.  During the following centuries, the Castle was destroyed and restored numerous times.  Henry VIII ordered the destruction of all monasteries in the 1530s.  During World War II, the Castle was damaged since Hastings was a target for bombing raids.  In 1951, the Hastings Corporation purchased the site and converted it into a tourist attraction.  The view from the ruins is spectacular and I got some great photos.

I returned to the train station to continue my journey to the picturesque market town of Battle, site of Battle Abbey and the 14 October 1066 Battle of Hastings, the most celebrated confrontation to take place on English soil.  King William I, the Conquerer, marked his victory by establishing the Benedictine abbey of Battle Abbey between 1070 and 1094.  Duke William of Normandy and the Normans’ defeat of the Saxon king, Harold, changed the course of English history.  The abbey flourished for over 400 years until King Henry VIII suppressed the monasteries in the 1530s.

I visited the museum and took the Battlefield Walk photographing the site of the Battle and the Abbey ruins.  After my visit to the Abbey, I stopped at Mrs. Burton’s Restaurant, Tea Room and Bistro across the street for a salad and cup of tea.  When I asked to call a taxi to return to the train station, I learned that no taxis are available after school for almost an hour since they are transporting students to their homes.  I walked back to the train station and began my return journey to Canterbury.

 

Hastings Castle
Hastings Castle
Hastings Castle

 

Hastings Castle

 

Hastings Castle
Hastings Castle Hill Funicular

 

Hastings Castle

 

 

 

Hastings Castle Hill View

 

 

 

 

 

Hastings Old Town Tunnel Entrance
Battle Abbey Entrance

 

Battle Abbey
Battle Abbey

 

Battle Abbey
Battle Abbey Wall from Walk
Battle Abbey Walk
Battlefield Sign
Battlefield Sign
Battlefield Sign

 

Battlefield Site
Battlefield Site

 

Battlefield Site
Battle Abbey School

 

 

 

 

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